Predetermined Answers – A Zen Story

December 28, 2018

4 min read

Summary: A Questioner narrates an interesting Zen story to Sadhguru, and also shares an explanation about it. Sadhguru tells us that we can not make a moral out of a Spiritual process. Spirituality is about a way to be, and not a way to do. An action is only relevant to the situation one exists in. So, there is no right or wrong answer, there is no right or wrong action - there is only appropriate action and an appropriate answer. Approaching any situation with predetermined answers is not appropriate. Sadhguru says, this is the essential difference between morality and consciousness.

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article originally published on isha.sadhguru.org

When A Simple Question Becomes A Knotty Problem – A Zen Story

Questioner: There is a zen story that I heard. There were once two neighboring zen monasteries each with a young novice. Every morning on his way to the market, one boy ran into the other.

“Where are you going?” asked one.

“Wherever the wind blows,” the other responded.

This reply puzzled the first child who went to his master for help. “Tomorrow morning,” the master told him, “When you meet that little fellow, ask him the same question and then you ask him, ‘What if the wind stopped blowing.’ That will fix him.”

The children met again the following morning.

“Where are you going?” asked the first child.

“Wherever my feet take me,” answered the other. This again nonplussed the youngster, who took his defeat to the master.

“What if you had no feet?” suggested the master.

The next day the children met a third time.

“Where are you going?” asked the first child.

“To the market,” the other replied.

“Foiled again!”

Questioner: There is an explanation given. In changing with the changes, the more we chase, the farther away we get. Meet the changes by not changing, for the number of ways to change is limited while the number of ways to stay the same is infinite. While the number of ways to change is limited, the number of ways to stay without change is infinite.

Sadhguru: Once you explain it too much, there is nothing in it. You cannot make a moral out of it. Spiritual process is not about coming up with right answers. Spiritual process is about realizing the right way to be.

How we respond to a particular situation essentially depends upon the situation. If we are predetermined in how to handle a situation, then as the situation changes, your reaction will not be in accordance with the situation. Action is always relevant only to the situation in which we exist. There is no right answer or wrong answer. There is no right action or wrong action. There is only appropriate answer. There is only appropriate action.

There is no right and wrong, there is only appropriateness to life. If you understand the appropriateness of life, you will handle it well.

Whatever we do, if it is not appropriate to the situation in which we exist, it is meaningless. But the logical mind, a very mundane limited mind always thinks there is something called “right” and something called “wrong”. There is no right and wrong, there is only appropriateness to life. If you understand the appropriateness of life, you will handle it well. If you do not understand the appropriateness of life, you will come with readymade answers and readymade solutions which will always throw you off.

Questioner: Can you give an example of a readymade answer and readymade solution?

Sadhguru: This is the essential difference between morality and consciousness. Morality is trying to give you readymade answers. A mind which is already in a state of conclusion is dead to the realities of life. If it has to be alive, it has to be aware. It should have no conclusions.

The essence of spiritual process is just this – you are not concluding, you are only seeking.

When that boy said “wind”, or “feet” or simply “market”, this boy did not know what to say because he had conclusions in his mind. The essence of spiritual process is just this – you are not concluding, you are only seeking. A zen monk means his life is about seeking, and seeking is only possible when you have no conclusions. Someone has become a theist, someone has become an atheist – both of them have made conclusions. These conclusions will not lead to truth. These conclusions will only lead to a fight between the two groups or two individuals.

If we have to seek, the first and foremost thing is to be like a mirror to the situation in which you exist, that you are able to grasp the situation for what it is and you are able to act. This also is the basis of all success in the world. Spiritual or material success will happen to you only when you are able to see what is there right now, just the way it is. The moment you have a conclusion in your mind, you cannot see it the way it is. Then you will be completely off the mark.


What is Wrong With This Story – A Zen Story

April 15, 2019

3 min read

Summary: In a monastery a Zen master narrates a story to his disciples. At the end of the story, he asked the disciples - "what is wrong with this story?". None of the disciples got it; the master smiled and walked away. Sadhguru unravels the hidden wisdom of the story. A true master - wherever there is a need and a possibility - will not hesitate to show compassion. Compassion can not choose - it is not bound by morals, laws and beliefs.

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article originally published on isha.sadhguru.org

Will the Buddha Save Him? – A Zen Story

Story: In a Zen monastery, the disciples had gathered around the master. “Please listen to the story I am going to tell you attentively,” said the master and started his narrative.

“Once when the Buddha was sitting with his eyes closed, he heard someone screaming ‘Help! Help!’ He realized that it was the voice of a man who had fallen into the pits of hell and was suffering there. The Buddha realized that this punishment was given to him because he had committed many murders and thefts when he was living. He felt compassionate and wanted to help him out.

He looked for some good deed the man had performed when he was living. The man had once carefully avoided stepping on a spider while he was walking. Buddha asked that spider to help the man. The spider sent a long strong thread into the pit, the type that it uses to spin its web. The man caught hold of the thread and started climbing up. When the others who were suffering their punishments tried to climb up using the same thread, the man got anxious. “This thread has been sent for me. If so many people try to climb on this, the thread will break!” he shouted angrily. That very moment the thread broke and he fell into the pit again.

The man started screaming, “Help, Help!” again, but this time Buddha did not pay attention to his cries.

The master stopped the story here and asked, “What is wrong with this story?”

One disciple said, “The thread of a spider does not have the strength to carry a man.”

“There is no such thing as heaven and hell,” said another.

Another disciple said, “When Buddha was sitting with his eyes closed and meditating he must have heard some other sound.”

“All of you have missed the important thing,” said the master with a smile and got up and walked away.


Sadhguru: True compassion will not choose. The moment someone thinks, “Let me be compassionate to this person.” Then later, “That person is not worthy of my compassion,” then it is not fit to be called compassion anymore. There can be choice in helping someone, but there can be no choice with compassion. If the Buddha wished to save someone who was suffering in hell, he would not have changed his mind because of one selfish act committed by that person.

A true enlightened master will not hesitate to show compassion when there is such a need and a possibility.

Virtue and sin, good and bad, have all been written down according to morals. Compassion is beyond the reach of morals, laws, and beliefs. Compassion cannot be doled out to one person and denied to another.

What the Zen master told his disciples was a moral story which somebody had made up. The moral of the story is that even the Buddha will not save a selfish person who is not concerned about others. This story had been created to fix society and influence people’s actions.

A true enlightened master will not hesitate to show compassion when there is such a need and a possibility. Only someone who has evolved to total freedom within himself and gone beyond the compulsions of selecting and rejecting can be a Buddha. Only someone who is blissful can be compassionate. One is called a “Buddha” because he is in a blissful state beyond his buddhi or intellect.

Some religious fanatics have fabricated these moralistic stories with the intent of spreading Buddhism like other religions. That is why the Zen master points out that there is a flaw in the story.


How to Deal With a Thief – A Zen Story

May 15, 2019

4 min read

Summary: This blog narrates two similar stories of a compulsive thief; one from "Les Miserables" and another a Zen parable. Sadhguru explains - a human being can face any kind of punishment given to him, but melts when faced with immense compassion. The way to deal with a thief is compassion and not punishment. A disciple should be someone who is willing to make use of every situation to grow and transform. Those who put conditions on the Guru, are not really interested in transformation - it is better to let them go, then to waste time on them.

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How to Defeat a Thief? – a Zen Story

A man who lived in unbearable hunger and poverty resorted to small acts of theft. He landed up in prison and tried to escape many times only to be caught again. Each time, his prison sentence got further extended. Finally, after many years, he came out into the world once more.

Cold and hunger tortured him. He had no money and no means to earn even one meal. Nobody was ready to trust an ex-convict and offer him a job. He wandered to many places, but wherever he went, he was chased away. After being beaten up by people in one village, he ended up finding sanctuary in the village priest’s house.

He did not expect the priest to welcome him so graciously: “This is God’s house. Whether someone is a criminal or a sinner, anybody who comes here looking for shelter are God’s children.” So the priest consoled him and gave him food to eat, clothes to wear and a place to stay.

He ate well, slept and came awake in the middle of the night with renewed vigor. His eyes fell on some silverware in a room. Overcome with a compulsive urge to steal, he picked up the silverware and fled, not sparing even one thought about betraying the one who fed him.

Walking around the village, carrying silverware, he soon attracted the suspicion of the villagers. The police caught him and interrogated him. Because they could not get a proper answer from him, they then took him to the priest’s house. “We suspect that he stole this silver from you. Could you please confirm if it is yours?” the police asked the priest.

The man trembled, fearing that his theft would be revealed and that he would be sent to spend many more years in prison.

But the priest’s face was full of compassion. He said, “My friend, I had offered the silver candlesticks along with this silver to you. Why did you leave the candlesticks behind?” He then gave the candlesticks to him. “Our apologies. We thought this was a theft.” the police said, and released the man, who was overwhelmed by the priest’s compassion, and went on their way. The above is an episode from “Les Miserables”.

There is a similar story from the Zen tradition, which may have inspired western storytellers. It carries the same message:

A Zen master noticed a commotion amongst his disciples and asked them what happened.

“He has stolen again,” they said and pushed a disciple forward to face the master. The master said, “Forgive him.”

“No way. We have forgiven him many times for your sake. Now if you don’t send him out, all of us are going to leave,” the disciples threatened.

“I have no intention of sending him away even if all of you leave,” said the master.

The disciple who had committed the crime fell at the master’s feet and broke down into tears.

Sadhguru’s Explanation

Sadhguru: A human being may have the strength to face any kind of punishment given to him, but he will be defeated by immense compassion. Punishments can make a person rock solid, but compassion beyond reason will shatter him.

Punishments can make a person rock solid, but compassion beyond reason will shatter him.

As you become increasingly hard on a person, he becomes more and more capable of handling the punishments you mete out. It is only compassion that will melt him. A spiritual master or a Guru does not judge somebody based on what he is right now. Someone who plants a coconut sapling will not cut it off after the fourth week just because it did not bear nuts. Likewise, a Guru will look at what kind of inner potential each disciple carries and see how to bring it to fruition. He will not neglect anyone just because he does not have the necessary capability right now.

Whoever calls themselves his disciples should be willing to make use of every opportunity for their growth and transformation. Especially, if a situation that does not sit well with them arises, it is the best situation for them to transform themselves. Instead, if they put conditions on the Guru asking him to do this or that, it means that their only intention is in throwing their weight around. They are not really interested in any transformation. Such people are not fit to call themselves disciples. It is better to let them go than waste time with them.


The Buffalo’s Tail – A Zen Story

June 26, 2019

5 min read

Summary: The famous Zen story about the buffalo's tail - what is this story trying to tell us? Sadhguru tells us another story, that of how Bahubali got enlightened. And through that he explains what the hidden message in this simple zen story is. This is a must read, for all those seeking to grow on the spiritual path!

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article originally published on isha.sadhguru.org

A Zen Story: The Buffalo’s Tail

Story:

One day, disciples sat around their Zen master. One of them said, “Oh, Master! Please tell us a story today!”

The master said, “Okay, but I will ask you a question at the end of the story.”

In their eagerness to listen to the story, they all said, “Sure! We are ready.”

The master began telling the story. “There was one very fat buffalo in a village. Every day it walked past a hut on its way to the fields where it grazed. On the roof of the hut, people had placed many straw bundles to help keep the inside of the hut cool.

The buffalo used to raise its head and pull-down bundles of straw that were within its reach and munch on them. When it could not reach any more straw bundles on the roof, it thought, “If they have strewn so many straw bundles on the roof of the hut, then how many must be inside? But alas, the window of the hut was always closed and the buffalo could not see what was inside.

One day as it was on its way to the fields, the buffalo’s eyes sparked in astonishment. The window of the hut was open! The buffalo excitedly went to the window and carefully put its head inside, expertly moving its head so that its horns do not get in the way. Just as it had expected, there were many bundles of straw stacked in one corner of the hut.

No matter how much it stretched its neck, it could not reach the straw. So, now it tried to squeeze its body in through the same window. His horns, face and all of his neck was inside, but the straw was still out of reach.

Slowly it brought its front legs inside the hut. It pressed its legs on the wall and pulled its body in. Little by little, its huge body broke through the window bars and, now the biggest parts of its body – the hump and stomach – were inside. All that was left were the hind legs. It slowly brought in one leg at a time, steadying itself.

Grunting loudly with its accomplishment, it believed it had fully entered the hut. It stretched its neck to reach the straw, but it could not, because its tail was still stuck!”

The master stopped his story here.

He asked, “Is this story possible or not?”

The disciples said, “This is not at all possible.”

“Why?”

“The smallest part of a buffalo is its tail. If it could put its head and stomach inside, why couldn’t it bring its tail in?”

The master said, “There are many buffaloes amongst you.”

Sadhguru’s explanation:

Sadhguru: There is a wonderful story about Bahubali. Bahubali had seen many wars. At one stage, he had to fight a war against his own brother. Many warriors’ heads rolled in that war and the battlefield was full of dead bodies and rivers of blood.

When he saw all this, he was shocked. A transformation happened within him. A question arose within him, “Why did I take away so many lives?” but he could not find an answer. The next moment he renounced the war and everything he was doing. With complete attention, without moving an inch, Bahubali stood in one place for fourteen years in deep meditation. Through the intensity of that sadhana, many things that he was attached to broke down within him.

That man who wanted to conquer the entire world stood there in great humility, ready to bow down even to a donkey. But he did not get enlightened.

In all those fourteen years, he did not utter a word to anybody, nor did he change his stance for any reason. He could not understand why he had not gotten enlightened. Then a yogi came walking in his direction. The yogi turned to look at Bahubali. Bahubali longed to ask him, “What more should I do?” But having stood in silence for fourteen years, he did not have the heart to open his mouth and ask. Instead a teardrop rolled down from his left eye as the question:

“I have lost my kingdom. I renounced my family, palace and comforts. I have melted to the point of even bowing down to an insect. What more is there for me to do?”

The yogi said, “You have turned into a wonderful human being. You can bow down to a worm or an insect, but are you willing to bow down to your brother like this? No. That is what is holding you back.”

Bahubali realized his state. He dissolved what was binding him because of his hatred to his brother. He attained at that very moment.

Like this many people come to the Isha Yoga Center, giving up the comforts of their home, money and family. Many come at a young age, foregoing the pleasures of youth. They don’t eat what they want, they don’t do drugs, they are not enslaved to lust, they work day and night without any ego about what they are doing. But they would have held onto something with them without knowing!

At times when I look at it, it is so tragic it pains me, “Why are they holding on to something that is so stupid?”

When transitioning from one dimension to another, when entering a land which you are absolutely clueless about, people unconsciously cling to something that is familiar, refusing to let it go. They will hold onto something from the past, or something that they learned, or something that they enjoyed.

Even if you take them to heaven, their little finger will still be tightly wrapped around something. It could be something as simple as a cellphone or a bed sheet they use. Or they will think of a certain place as their own and only sit and meditate in that spot.

Even if the entire body passes through, this is how just the tail gets stuck. If the tail is cut off at the right time, they will get enlightened.


A Blind Man Carrying A Lantern – A Zen Story

July 30, 2019

3 min read

Summary: Sadhguru narrates a short zen parable of a blind man carrying a lantern, and then explains what the parable is trying to say. We create processes to benefit our lives. These become part of our culture. But most times we forget why these processes were created in the first place, and start following them blindly. Over time, these get distorted and don't serve the purpose that they were designed for. The new generation then wonders and gets confused about whether it is needed for our life or not. Sadhguru emphasizes this with an example of a certain tradition followed in Karnataka.

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article originally published on isha.sadhguru.org

The Blind Man and the Lamp – A Zen Story

Story: A blind man stayed with his friend for a few days, and then started for his hometown in the night. His friend gave him a lit lantern, but the man protested, “Why do I need a lantern? Everything is the same for me. For someone who is blind, what is the use of carrying a lamp?”

“My dear friend, this is not for you; this is for the person who comes in front of you. If you have this lamp in your hand, the person who comes in front of you will not bump into you.”

“In that case, I will take it,” the blind man said.

He took the lamp and started walking in the dark. In spite of that, someone collided into him head-on down the road. The blind man lost his balance and fell down. He got angry and asked, “Why did you bump into me? I had a lamp with me – can’t you watch where you’re going?”

“What lamp? I don’t see anything,” said the man who bumped into him and looked around.

Then he found the lamp and said, “Oh yes! There is a lamp here, but the flame had gone out long ago, my dear friend.”

Sadhguru: The man held the lamp in his hands for the light it gave. Holding it high and walking even after the flame died out is just a meaningless ritual. Many things that we started in our life with a purpose have lost their original quality and are continuing as mere rituals.
There is a certain tradition in Karnataka. If non-vegetarian food is served to a guest at someone’s home, they will keep a pestle next to the leaf on which food is served. I asked many people the reason for this, but they did not know. After asking several elderly people who were well-versed in the culture, I found out the answer.

Earlier, the tradition was to keep a small stick next to the leaf as a toothpick, in case the person got something stuck between his teeth. As time went by, they replaced the tiny toothpick with a stick and then some fool started putting a pestle instead of a stick. Later, this became the standard practice without anyone asking for an explanation. Can anyone use a pestle as a toothpick?

This is how we create certain processes to benefit our lives. But when we forget why these processes were fundamentally created and start following things simply because our grandfathers and fathers did it, it becomes a mere ritual. Because we do not understand why something was done in our tradition generation after generation, we are confused about whether it is needed for our life or not.

Like a blind man carrying a lamp, certain tools that were created to guide us in our lives have become superstitions. It is high time we understand their true purpose and make them into lamps to guide us in our lives. Otherwise, we should at least create new tools to guide us.


Making Tea – A Zen Story

October 9, 2019

4 min read

Summary: Sadhguru narrates a short Zen parable, and elaborates on how one should strive to find full expression to one's capabilities. Is it better to approach life thinking "I can do this, I can not do this", or thinking "I have to do this, and I should not do this"?

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article originally published on isha.sadhguru.org

Making Tea For a Lazy Disciple – A Zen Story

Story:

In a monastery, a Zen master gathered firewood and started a fire for a stove. He was preparing tea. A disciple asked him, “For whom are you preparing tea?”

The master replied, “You see that lazy guy sitting over there? It is for him.”

He was referring to one particularly lazy disciple who kept dodging work and just sat around, while all the other disciples were active in work.

The disciple said, “Why do you have to prepare tea for him? He has grown up now. Let him prepare it on his own.”

The Master smiled and said, “I am here and now.”

Sadhguru’s explanation:

What’s the most important teaching in life? You do what you can do. It is far better to see that “I can do this and I cannot do this” rather than thinking “I have to do this and I should not do this.”
When you identify yourself with something and think, “This is my family. This is my wife. This is my mother. This is my house. This is my street,” you conclude that “I will do this. I will not do that.” You will start thinking “If my child gets injured I have to run and save him, but if some other child is getting injured why should I bother?”

Nobody belongs to you in this world. They ended up coming into this world just the way you came in, that is all. If you get married, you say, “This is my wife.” If you get divorced, you say “This is not my wife!” Both are relationships fixed by you. When you get married and feel that your spouse is a part of you, you accordingly develop love and pleasant thoughts towards them. Once you deny the relationship, these emotions change and you start feeling frustrated, angry and hateful.

So when you think something belongs to you, the emotions that come with it are hugely discriminatory. This will never bring out your capabilities to the fullest.

Raju and Malathi were lovers. As they belonged to different castes, their families and their communities were not ready to accept their marriage.

Raju said, “When we can’t live together, what is the point of this life? Come, let us die together.”

Both of them climbed up to a cliff. They stood there hand in hand at the edge. When they were just about to jump, Malathi said, “Raju, I am terrified. You jump first! I will get the courage to jump after seeing you go!”

Raju said, “I love you, Malathi!” and jumped from the edge in a moment.

Malathi saw him fall into a deep trench below where nobody could get to. She also got ready to jump. At that moment she thought, “Now Raju is no more. If Raju is not there, my love is no more. If there is no love anymore, no family problem, no social problem. When there is no problem at all, why should I give up my life?”

She looked down at the trench below and shouted, “Raju, I love you!” and started walking back home.

When you think “this is mine” or “she is mine,” the actions that come out of that will be just like this.

Those who walk on the spiritual path do not shrink themselves like that. They don’t say, “I will do something for this person, I will not do something for that person.” They will only think, “At this moment I can do this. If there is an opportunity to do it, I will do it,” and they will act accordingly.

If you want to realize your life to the fullest, first and foremost is you should never shrink yourself into thinking “This is mine and this is not mine.” If you expand within yourself to include the whole world, then everything is yours.


The Path to Nirvana – A Zen Story

November 25, 2019

3 min read

Summary: Sadhguru narrates the Zen story of a disciple searching for the 'direct' path to Nirvana, and the master telling him "it's right here". Sadhguru explains, wherever you want to go, whether you want to attain nirvana, or go to some place, the journey can only start from where you are right now. He says - "If you ask for liberation without moving an inch from the place you are in, how will you ever get it?". Only if you take a step from where you are, you can move towards reaching your goal.

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article originally published on isha.sadhguru.org

The Path to Nirvana – A Zen Story

Sadhguru: There was once a young man who longed to attain nirvana and bask in ecstasies.

He went to many people and asked them, “What is the path to nirvana?”

Everybody who heard this question told him, “All roads lead to the land of the Buddha, but there is one road which leads directly to the gates of nirvana. Only that particular Zen master knows about that road. Go to him, he will guide you.” They told him the name of a very famous Zen master and asked him to go to his monastery.

The young man reached the monastery and fell at the master’s feet.

He asked with great humility, “Oh, Master! I have surrendered at your feet. Please show me the way.”

The master said, “It is just outside the compound wall.”

The disciple wondered if the master did not understand his question properly.

He said, “Master, I am not asking about the road outside the compound wall. I seek the ultimate road.”

“Oh, that one? It is the same road that goes to the capital city. Don’t you know that?”

“Not that one, Master. Wherever I asked, people told me that all roads lead to the land of the Buddha, but there is one road that leads directly to the gates of nirvana. And they said that you know this path very well. I want to know where that path is.”

“Oh, that path? It is right here,” said the master, pointing to the place where the disciple was standing.

Sadhguru’s Explanation:

If you ask for liberation without moving an inch from the place you are in, how will you ever get it?

Whether you want to attain nirvana or reach Mumbai, where can the journey begin? You can start only from where you are right now. Instead, if you imagine that the path to liberation starts elsewhere, you will get lost in that illusion. Whatever kind of journey, it can start only from where we are right now.

The only reason human beings have not evolved within themselves, in spite of living on this planet for thousands of years, is because they have not gotten this point. Today we are getting angry in the same way the caveman got angry. The external situations and weapons have become more complex, but the fundamentals are exactly the same.

Despite witnessing how much suffering, ugliness and sorrow is caused by anger, we have not understood how to go beyond this petty emotion. Why are we in such a state? Simply because we are not ready to move from the place we are in right now. If you ask for liberation without moving an inch from the place you are in, how will you ever get it? Without seeing where we are standing now, if we plan to start from the next street, a journey will not happen. You will keep going in circles in your imaginary world.

Only if we take the next step from where we are right now, and the next step and the next step, can a journey happen.

The Zen master was indicating just this to the young man.


Of Laughter and Enlightenment – A Zen Story

December 19, 2019

5 min read

Summary: This is an interesting Zen story, where a disciple gets enlightened when the master laughs! Sadhguru explains that there is a deep connection between Zen and laughter. In fact, he says, that anyone who has attained a certain state within himself, they can laugh at everything. Sadhguru narrates an amusing incident from his life, when he started laughing loudly when a few volunteers escaped death from an accident! He says - "One who has lost his laughter has lost everything. This is what the Zen master demonstrated to his disciple".

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article originally published on isha.sadhguru.org

Of Laughter and Enlightenment – A Zen Story

There was a Zen monastery where many disciples gathered to learn from the master. Of all the disciples, the newest disciple was the most active, taking up lots of work. If his master wanted something, he would reach his side before anyone else. He instantly completed any tasks given to him by his master. He was the last to sleep and the first to wake up and begin the daily chores. The master took note of this and asked him one day, “Where were you before you came here?”

The disciple replied, “I was learning from Shaling Kyu.”

“Oh, Shaling Kyu! I have heard about him. Once when he was walking on a bridge, he tripped and fell into the water. Right?” asked the master.

“Yes, Master.”

“Do you know that he became realized at that very moment?”

“I didn’t know about that. But he has written a poem about his realization.”

“Do you remember that poem?”

“Yes master, I remember.”

“Then tell me.”

“I have found a pearl.

For long time dust and dirt had covered its brightness.

Now the dust has flown away. The dirt is gone.

Brightness has been born.

The mountains and the rivers have been lit with its light.”

The moment he finished reciting this poem, the master let out a loud laugh.

The disciple was confused, “What is so funny about this poem? Why did the Master laugh?” But no matter how much he thought about it, he could not find an answer. His sleep was ruined that night. The moment he got up the next morning, he came looking for his master.

“Oh, Master! Why did you laugh when I told you that poem yesterday?”

The master said, “You are worse than a clown.”

“What?”

“Yes, clowns make others laugh, but you get terrified if someone laughs.” Saying this, he started laughing loudly again.

This laughter of the master enlightened his disciple.

Sadhguru’s explanation:

Sadhguru: There is a deep connection between Zen and laughter.

Most of the Zen masters were the kind to laugh loudly. Not only Zen, anyone who has attained a certain elated state within themselves do not wait for a reason to laugh. Whether it is good news or bad news, they can laugh.

In my youth, after enlightenment flowered within me, I looked at everybody around me and thought, “Why are these people, who are capable of being extremely blissful every moment of their lives, messing up their lives like this?” Tears would stream down my face.

But soon, I realized that whenever I saw ignorance in people around me, it was more blissful to laugh than shed tears. There is no meaning in going on shedding tears.

In this world, more than poverty or disease, it is ignorance that is widespread. What better opportunity can you find to laugh than when you see ignorance? If you have the intelligence to relate ignorance and blissfulness, then there is really no problem.

Once, I was driving in the mountains in the US. It was pouring rain. Volunteers from Isha were travelling with me in different cars.

In the car behind me, there were three American women with an Isha volunteer. Generally I drive fast and they were trying to drive their car at my speed.

I warned them, saying, “Don’t try to match my speed.”

They said, “No, this route is familiar to us,” and they kept going at the same speed.

The mountain road made a bend at one place. I maintained the same speed through the bend, but the car behind me was unable to manage the turn. At great speed, it hit a lone tree that was standing nearby. In that impact, the car bent the tree a little and sort of climbed up the tree like a beast, so that it was hanging half on the tree and half on the road. If it had missed slightly, it would have fallen into a 400 feet deep valley.

From my rearview mirror, I witnessed everything from the moment the car hit the tree. I brought my car back a little and parked it, got out and looked at their state.

The ladies inside were shouting and screaming. The car was hanging precariously on the edge, and we slowly got each one out safely from the car one by one.

All of them could have died in an accident like that. But they escaped. Even after escaping a disaster, they could not move beyond the fear and commotion that it caused. The American women started crying even more vigorously.

But the woman from Isha started to laugh out loud the moment she stepped out. The moment I reached there, I also started laughing uncontrollably.

The American women got even more angry and shouted, “How can you behave so irresponsibly when we’re suffering like this?”

I continued to laugh and told them, “If you had all died I wouldn’t have laughed like this. I would have waited for some time and then laughed.”

At any point in life, or in any situation of life, how you face what comes to you depends on how ignorant you are. Where did you come from? Where are you going? You don’t know anything, but you imagine something on your own and get caught up in that. You are going to be here for a very short span, so why make it such a mess out of your foolishness?

You may come up with a thousand reasons to lose your laughter. “I lost my father. I lost my mother. I lost my wife. I lost my husband. I lost my child.” Whatever reason you may give, there is no reason to lose your laughter.

If people have lost their laughter, there is only one reason: they are at the peak of ignorance, have lost sense of life. If you attain an ecstatic state, laughter is all that is left. If you listen to the sound of a temple bell, you will see that it is closest to the sound of a loud laughter. One who has lost his laughter has lost everything. This is what the Zen master demonstrated to his disciple.


Nothing to Get – A Zen Story

January 21, 2020

5 min read

Summary: This is a zen story about a disciple of the sixth Zen sect who joined a monastery called Kaaksi. Sadhguru explains that what this story is trying to tell is that, realization or enlightenment is not trying to get hold of something, rather realizing what is there already. For that, first you must realize that you do not know. Sadhguru says - "Only if you know that you do not know, you will start longing to know that which you do not know. Now, the possibility of knowing the unknown will arise".

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Nothing to Get – A Zen Story

Story

A disciple who belonged to the Sixth Zen Sect joined a monastery called Kaaksi and attained enlightenment under the master’s guidance.

The master asked him to go around the world, so he began his travels. In one city, a student from another monastery met him and asked, “Where are you coming from?”

“I am coming from the Kaaksi monastery that belongs to the Sixth Sect,” said the enlightened disciple.

“What did you get in that monastery?”

“There was nothing there which I did not already have before joining Kaaksi,” said the disciple.

“Then why did you go there?”

“If I had not gone there, how would I have known that there was nothing there that I did not have before?”

Sadhguru’s explanation

Sadhguru : Enlightenment is not getting hold of something. Not leaping and attaining a target. Not reaching a mountain peak. It is just realizing the self, that’s all.

When you realize the truth that is already there, we call it realization. It is just like there was something always in front of your eyes but you missed it, and now suddenly you noticed it.

You can create a lie, but you cannot create a new truth. You can only delve into something that is already there and realize it. This is enlightenment or liberation.

Just to realize that there is something called knowing, you need to go to someone who is fully realized. Otherwise you will imagine something on your own and believe that you know everything. In other words, you must first know that you do not know what enlightenment means. The problem is, people don’t even understand that they do not know.

My childhood problem was that I did not know a thing! If I took a leaf in my hands, I would sit for hours just looking at it. If they gave me a glass of water to drink at home, I would sit there for hours just staring at it without drinking. I used to sit up in my bed and stare at the darkness the entire night. I always kept staring at something or the other.

Only if you know that you do not know, you will start longing to know that which you do not know. Now, the possibility of knowing the unknown will arise.

People around me thought that I had some kind of psychological problem. Others thought that some ghost or evil spirit had possessed me. But in reality, because I did not know anything, I just kept staring at anything my eyes fell on. I did not know any other way to find out about things.

Meanwhile, the people around me looked like they knew everything. And they seemed to be living happily because of their knowledge. They knew about everything that is here and even about things that are not visible to the eyes. They knew God, they knew what heaven was, they knew the entire cosmos. I heard a lot about people claiming to speak to gods and gods speaking to them.

I grew interested in knowing what happened to people and how they behaved after meeting and talking with God. So I sat outside the temple many times and looked intently at people who went in and came out. But the people who came out of the temple looked interested only in gossiping about people, spreading and listening to rumors.

The purpose of going to the right Guru or master is not to get something new. It is to get his help to realize something that is within you but you did not notice.

At Indian temples, it is common for your footwear to walk away with somebody else. So I have seen people who lost their footwear cursing God very intensely.

It seemed to me that people who walked out of restaurants looked happier and more satisfied than those coming out of temples. Divine versus dosa – it was dosa that always won!

At that point of time I did not know what was divine or what was the nature of the divine. And of course, I also liked dosa. But I was assured that whatever was the source of the creation, it must be a far bigger phenomenon than to a dosa. But in fact, it was the dosa that gave people more fulfillment.

I felt something was fundamentally wrong with this situation. It took some time for me to realize that in reality nobody knew anything. They just derive satisfaction from their imagination. Because of readymade explanations and beliefs, human beings are not even ready to accept that they do not know. Only if you know that you do not know, you will start longing to know that which you do not know. Now, the possibility of knowing the unknown will arise.

The purpose of going to the right Guru or master is not to get something new. It is to get his help to realize something that is within you but you did not notice.

What was possible for me is also possible for you. It is also possible for your neighbor and even your enemy. You don’t have to acquire something new.


These are Bamboos – A Zen Story

February 28, 2020

3 min read

Summary: This is a Zen story about a man longing to reach higher states like Budha, and going in search of a master. After a steep climb, he finds the master at the top of a mountain. The master shows him some bamboo vegetation and asks him a couple of questions, and then leaves. Sadhguru explains, that the conclusions we draw from our five senses are always in comparison to something else. If one wants to perceive life, then one has to move beyond the five sense perceptions.

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These are Bamboos – A Zen Story

Story: A man who heard about Buddha’s life started longing to reach higher states within himself just like the Buddha did. He met many masters and enquired about the Buddha, but he was not satisfied with their explanations. Then one person told him that there was a master living on the peak of certain mountain and that he knew everything about the Buddha. “Go ask him,” the person told him.

So the man trekked up the difficult mountain path, finally reached the master’s hut and entered. He noticed there were many disciples there already. The master was talking to his many disciples. When he saw this man, the master asked him to come closer and asked him, “What do you want?”

The man said, “I am wandering in search of the Buddha’s teachings. I have met many scholars, but nobody could fully answer my questions. I heard that you will be able to explain this better than all the others so I came to you.”

“Oh! Please be seated. I will tell you after all of them leave,” said the Zen master.

The man was satisfied. He concluded that this master must be really good for so many disciples to gather around him. The master spoke with each of his disciples and then sent them on their way. Finally, he came to the man and said, “Come with me!” He led the man across the slopes. After covering a certain distance, they came upon some vegetation before them. The master pointed to it and asked, “What is this?”

The man replied, “Bamboo.”

The master then pointed to other bamboo shoots that were off to the side and asked, “When you look at these, what do you see?”

The man said, “That bamboo is tall. This bamboo has not yet grown up and is short.”

The master said, “These are bamboos!” and started walking back to his hut.

Sadhguru: Let us say you are six feet tall. When you are among people who have not crossed five and a half feet, you will think you are tall. You will walk like a tall person, sit like a tall person, and run like a tall person. If we suddenly transport you to another country, where the minimum height is eight feet, you will suddenly feel short, walk like a short person and sit like a short person.

The conclusions people draw from their five senses are predominantly in comparison with something else. Comparison is only needed to conduct our affairs in day-to-day life. If you touch something that is cold, it just means that your body is hot. Seeing things in comparison like this is not true perception. If you want to perceive life in its true dimension, you must stop comparing and making conclusions that this is high or low, tall or short, beautiful or ugly. Whether you are six feet or eight feet tall, but ultimately you are still yourself.

Whether it is Buddha’s teaching or the basics of Yoga, it is just about perceiving life the way it is. For this to happen, you have to move beyond what is recorded by the five senses.


The Best Place to Be – A Zen Story

March 26, 2020

3 min read

Summary: A new disciple asked his widely traveled Zen master, "You have been to many places in the world. Which is the best place in the summer? Which is the best place during monsoon? Which is the best place to go during the winter?" The master kept walking in the rain and said, "If you really want to be in the best place, you must go to the place where there is no summer, rain or winter!" Sadhguru explains the message in this short zen story, that the master is trying to give to his disciple.

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The Best Place to Be - A Zen Story

Story: There was once a Zen master who had travelled to many parts of the world. One day he went out walking and a new disciple joined him.

Suddenly it started pouring. The disciple immediately broke a huge leaf from a nearby banana plant and held it over his head. He asked his master, “You have been to many places in the world. Which is the best place in the summer? Which is the best place during monsoon? Which is the best place to go during the winter?”

The master kept walking in the rain and said, “If you really want to be in the best place, you must go to the place where there is no summer, rain or winter!”

“Have you been there?”

“Yes!”

“Will you tell me where it is?”

“You find out and go!” said the master and walked on without breaking his stride.

Sadhguru: A teacher was explaining to her students with great zest about blood circulation in the body. She wanted to involve them more and asked a question to a boy in the class.

When you go beyond the limitations of the body, where can there be winter or summer?

“If I stand upside down now, blood will rush to my head and you will notice my face will turn red. But when I stand on my feet, my feet do not turn red. Can you explain why?”

Before she could bat her eyelids, the boy replied, “Because your feet ain’t empty.”

This disciple who asked questions to his Zen master knew life only to the extent that this schoolboy knew the human body. What is the best place to be during summer? A place which is cold will look like the best. In winter, a place which gets maximum sunshine will look like the best place to take a holiday. This is the kind of mindset that the disciple is revealing about himself by asking these questions. However, the master is reminding him, “This is not your life.”

The master was telling him, “Your life is about getting to that place where there is no summer, monsoon or winter.” The journey he is talking about is not a place that you can find on a geographical map. He is just indicating that his journey should go beyond the physical boundaries. When you go beyond the limitations of the body, where can there be winter or summer? Can the winter or the winds touch the depths of your interiority? Cold and heat can touch only the surface of your skin. This is not about thinking which place would make the best vacation spot because even if you go there, only the body will be comfortable, but there will be discomfort with everything else. From where you are right now, you can make your interiority in such a way that the external situations cannot touch you in any way.


Learning Zen from a Dog – A Zen Story

May 18, 2020

5 min read

Summary: Sadhguru narrates a short Zen story, when in response to a disciples question, the master replies "Learn from that Dog". The disciple is disappointed, what can one learn from a dog, he says - "You are making fun of me, Master. What can I learn from a dog? All it does is eat, sleep and reproduce. I have come in search of you only to become free from that.". Sadhguru explains, we are not even fully involved in the basic activity of eating and sleeping. He says - "When you eat, you are thinking about home, when you are at home you are thinking about work, when you are at work you are thinking about travel, when you are travelling you are thinking about when you can sleep, when you go to sleep you are thinking about something else. Your whole life rolls on like this."

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Learning Zen from a Dog

Story: A Zen master and his disciples went to bathe in a river. After bathing, the master came out and all his disciples gathered around him as he walked.

A disciple asked him, “Dear Master, what should I do to realize?”

The master said, “Learn from that dog,” referring to a dog that was nearby and kept walking.

The disciple was greatly disappointed and angry within himself that the master had ignored his question. Then he asked, “Oh, Master, what can I learn from a dog?”

The master walked on for some time without saying anything.

The disciple persisted, “I don’t want to learn from that dog, please tell me, Master.”

The master then pointed to another dog that was playing in the next street and said, “Then learn from this dog.”

“You are making fun of me, Master. What can I learn from a dog? All it does is eat, sleep and reproduce. I have come in search of you only to become free from that.”

“You also eat and sleep,” said the master and walked into his hut.

The disciple stood frozen in shock.

Sadhguru: What does an average man do today? He eats, but it cannot be considered as eating. He sleeps, but that cannot be considered as sleeping. Why? When he eats, he is not fully involved in it. Even if he is eating something delicious, he notices the taste only for the first mouthful. Then his mind keeps wandering elsewhere even as the food passes from his mouth down his throat and reaches the stomach. I would like to share an incident in my life. I was about 20 years old, and I sat down to eat. I put a morsel of food into my mouth and suddenly I felt as if my whole system was bursting within me. This is not something I noticed logically but experientially. It was the profound experience of witnessing a miracle: something that was on a plate had become me.

But if you cannot become one with even a morsel of food, how can you become one with the entire universe?

This is not a simple thing. For every life, this is actively happening every moment without a break. What was not you earlier is becoming you. Yoga is just this – you becoming one with something that is not you. Yoga means union or becoming one with this existence. People are longing just to taste this experience of oneness. But if you cannot become one with even a morsel of food, how can you become one with the entire universe? A small part of this planet is entering you and becoming you, what can be more miraculous?

Another miracle is sleep. When you are in deep asleep, who you are is absent and you become one with this existence. What is actually happening when you sleep? Most people do not experience deep sleep. A million things are happening in your head which manifest as dreams or murmuring during sleep.

When you eat, you are thinking about home, when you are at home you are thinking about work, when you are at work you are thinking about travel, when you are travelling you are thinking about when you can sleep, when you go to sleep you are thinking about something else. Your whole life rolls on like this.

If you have to realize your life to the fullest, you need to do whatever you are doing with hundred percent involvement and offer yourself totally to it. Because you are always caught up with your thought process, only your thoughts and emotions have become life for you. Emotions like anger, joy and fulfillment are created by your mind. You have become insensitive to the true sensations of your being.

When you eat, the universe is becoming a part of you. When you sleep, you are becoming a part of this universe.

Only when you are totally involved with what you are doing, you are in touch with life. When you eat, the universe is becoming a part of you. When you sleep, you are becoming a part of this universe. If you do this with one hundred percent involvement, the doors that lead into higher states of experience will open up for you.

Only this moment is real in this life. The previous moment and next moment are not there in our experience – they are imaginary. See how to do everything you are doing in life with complete and 100% involvement. If you want to fully experience the creation or the Creator, that is possible only in this moment. But you are mostly caught up in some other hallucinations.

When they say that the entire universe is “maya” or “illusion,” it just describes the way you are seeing it. Your mind is not seeing the existence the way it is; it is distorting it one way or the other to create an illusion. Your experience of seeing everything at that moment is just imaginary or illusory.

So to learn from a dog means that when you eat something, be fully involved with every morsel that goes into your mouth, enjoy it totally, and notice what happens as this morsel becomes a part of you. Eat totally! When you sleep, leave behind the idea that you are carrying the entire world on your shoulders, keep everything aside and sleep totally!


How to attain enlightenment?

July 19, 2020

2 min read

Summary: A Zen student went about claiming he has attained  'Enlightened' as he has embraced nothingness and is totally empty from within.  The Zen master quickly brought him to his senses.  It is irresponsible for people to speak as to what is 'enlightenment' or define 'enlightenment' because unscrupulous people will pick up these words and try to deceive someone or more importantly, people will delude themselves with such ideas and start hallucinating.

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Everything is Empty - A Zen Story

Zen Story: Yamaoka Tesshu, a samurai and student of Zen, travelled around Japan studying from various Zen masters. One day, he wandered into the Shokoku Temple and happened upon the monk Dokuon.

In a desire to show his comprehension of Zen, Tesshu stated to the Master, “The mind, the Buddha and all beings are empty. The true nature of all things is emptiness. There is no enlightenment, no delusion; no sages, no commoners; no toil, no reward.”

Enlightenment is not an attainment; it is a homecoming. It is extraordinary in the sense that you become utterly ordinary.

Master Dokuon remained quiet for some time and then banged him on the head.

Tesshu fumed in anger and asked, “What did you do that for?”

Master Dokuon replied, “If everything is empty, where did the temper come from?”

Sadhguru: Enlightenment is not an attainment; it is a homecoming. It is extraordinary in the sense that you become utterly ordinary. Emptiness means that you are no longer filled with any of your own stuff, there is nothing of yours. If you become like this that everything is yours or nothing is yours, in that kind of state there is no compulsiveness.

This samurai is claiming – he is empty and everything is empty – from whatever he has heard and read somewhere, he is claiming that he is that. After one knock on the head he gets angry. If everything is empty, if nothing is compulsive within you, where would anger come from? You did not choose to become angry to serve a certain purpose; it is just that you burst into anger because someone hit you on the head.

It is irresponsible for people to speak as to what is enlightenment because all kinds of fools will pick up these words and either they will try to deceive someone or more importantly, they will delude themselves with such ideas which are happening all over the place.

There are unscrupulous elements in society today who if you pay 25,000 rupees, they will declare you enlightened. If you want that kind of enlightenment, I am telling you do not waste your money, you declare yourself enlightened, because nothing is going to change anyway.


The Right Guru – A Zen Story

August 6, 2020

2 min read

Summary: Sadhguru narrates a short Zen story. He explains the hidden message in it. Normally, we choose friends who will support our limitations. But when you seek a spiritual master, you should be willing to break your limitations. You don't seek a master to hear pleasant things about yourself.  Sadhguru says - "Guru or a master is there to destroy the falsehood in you."

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The right guru - a zen story

Story: Zen Masters Yutang and Dayu accepted an invitation to instruct a major official interested in Zen. Master Yutang addressed the official, “You are a naturally intelligent and receptive man. I think you will make a fine student of Zen.”

In contrast, the other master Dayu exclaimed, “You’ve got to be kidding. This lamebrain may have a high position but he wouldn’t know Zen if he was hit over the head with it.”

Then the major official said, “After listening to your two honorable opinions I have decided what to do.”

In the end, not only did the official not build a temple for Yutang, he built one for Dayu and studied Zen with him.

Sadhguru: Normally when you choose friends, you choose those who support your limitations. You will always choose those kind of friends with whom your ego is comfortable. You seek a spiritual master not because you want to hear pretty things; you seek him because you want truth. You want to see the creation and the basis of creation just the way it is, not the way you think it is. Above all, a Guru or a master is there to destroy the falsehood in you. That is why I always say, if you sit with me and feel uncomfortable, you want to run away but you cannot run away, you keep coming back, then you have found your Guru. One who does not point out your limitations is not your Guru. To keep you comfortable, you can get married – you do not need to go to a Guru.

Guru or a master is there to destroy the falsehood in you.

You go to a Guru because you want to break your limitations, not to establish your limitations. The master who says, “You are great, you are wonderful,” is obviously looking for your money. A Guru is a friend who constantly punctures your ego. Others are friends who constantly pump up your ego. Saying pretty things about people is very easy but the real work of a Guru requires the necessary compassion to point out limitations with the risk that it may earn anger, hatred or wrath, in return. A master takes the risk of losing friendship because he is truly concerned about your wellbeing.

This official is wise because he recognized that. He knows where his wellbeing lies. He is not taken by flattery and pretty words. That is good!


In a Mustard Seed – A Zen Story

September 14, 2020

2 min read

Summary: This is a short Zen story from the Tang dynasty, about a man named Li Bo, who loved to study. Sadhguru explains the essence of this story - "…when you are truly meditative, there is no time and space for you."

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In a Mustard Seed – A Zen Story

Zen Story: During the Tang dynasty there was a man named Li Bo who loved to study. Because he had read over 10,000 volumes, people called him “Li of 10,000 volumes.”

Once, he asked the monk Zizank, “There is a passage in the Vimalakeerth Nirdesha Sutra which says, ‘Mount Sumeru can be inserted into a mustard seed.’ How could such a big mountain fit into a tiny mustard seed?’”

The master answered, “You are called Li of 10,000 volumes. How could those 10,000 volumes fit into a tiny skull?”

Sadhguru: This mustard seed analogy is essentially coming from the Yoga Sutras where this example is always used that you can fit the cosmos into a mustard seed. A mustard seed is something that we use on a daily basis, and it is the one of the smallest things. The whole cosmos can go into it because time and space is just a creation of our mind. This may be difficult for a logical mind to understand but today science is proving that to you in so many ways which is beyond the present level of human logic. Modern science is clearly saying that both time and space are stretchable and contractible. Experientially this is always true that when a person is in a certain state of experience, time suddenly gets compressed. Even in ordinary states of experience, people might have experienced that when someone is very joyful, twenty-four hours pass off like a moment; when someone is unhappy or depressed, twenty-four hours feel like a year.

…when you are truly meditative, there is no time and space for you.

Time is a very relative experience and so is space. In my own experience it has been so that when I am in certain states, a day feels like a moment for me. Or if I sit in one place, what I feel is like two minutes is seven to eight hours. Sometimes, I have just sat like that for many days, not knowing. People think that I am performing a great feat by sitting there for four days or six days or thirteen days at a stretch, but in my experience it is only for 25-30 minutes. There is no difficulty or any kind of struggle about sitting there. It is not a feat because once you transcend the limitations of your mind, there is no time and space. Time and space is the making of the mind. It is that meditative dimension that they are trying to convey through this story, that when you are truly meditative, there is no time and space for you.


Life and Death – A Zen Story

October 9, 2020

3 min read

Summary: Sadhguru narrates a short Zen story about Jingxuan and his master Liaoyi. Sadhguru tells is the essence of the story, "If one does not perceive life, how can he perceive what is death? Right now you are alive.....There is no such thing as death. It is only life."

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article originally published on isha.sadhguru.org

Life and Death – A Zen Story

Zen Story:

Jingxuan and his master Liaoyi went to pay their respects to the family of a deceased friend.

Jingxuan asked his master, “Is he alive or dead?”

The master said, “You cannot say he is alive and you cannot say he is dead.”

Jingxuan asked, “Why cannot you say it?

Liaoyi said, “If you cannot say it, you cannot say it.”

Jingxuan got furious, “You better say it or I will hit you!”

Liaoyi said, “If you are going to hit me, hit me. I still won’t say it.”

Jingxuan asked, “What kind of teacher are you? You know and yet you won’t tell your disciple.”

Jingxuan hit the master and left. “If you won’t say it, just forget it, that’s all.”

After some time, Liaoyi passed away. Jingxuan sought out another teacher named Liangshan and asked him the same question.

Liangshan responded, “You cannot say he is alive and you cannot say he is dead.”

Upon hearing this, Jingxuan got enlightened.

Sadhguru: If one does not perceive life, how can he perceive what is death? Right now you are alive. If you cannot perceive where you are, how can you perceive what is yet to be? Death is only an illusion created by the ignorant. There is no such thing as death. It is only life. If you perceive life, you will understand that what you call as death is just another dimension of life.

There is no such thing as death. It is only life.

If you try to understand death, you will end up with fanciful stories. You cannot perceive death because it is not yet for you. If you want to know death, you can only know it by experience. You cannot know it through someone else and the same is true with life. If you want to know life, you can only know it by experiencing it.

If you know life in its totality, it also includes death and that is the only way to know it. For us to declare that someone is alive and someone is dead is only socially relevant. Existentially it is not relevant. The Zen people are looking at the existential dimension.

Socially we can clearly say, “Someone is alive, someone is dead.” But existentially you do not know who is alive and who is dead. You do not even know whether you are alive or dead. You do not even know whether you are awake or dreaming. Existentially, that is the truth. If we want to existentially know what is real and what is not real, we must pay attention to life because life is now and this is the only doorway to know.

Anything that you wish to know about reality, the only doorway is now. You can only enter it from this moment, from the way it is. Life is only here. What is here is all that you can access. What is not here is just imagination. If you try to pursue something which is not yet, you will only end up in wild imaginations. But if you pay attention to what is there now, everything that is worth knowing can be perceived right now.


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